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All Hibernate Annotations: Mapping Annotations

This article provides a quick overview of all Hibernate mapping annotations. These Hibernate mapping annotations are from the Hibernate official user guide.

Also, check out JPA Mapping Annotations

Check out Hibernate Developer Guide and Spring Hibernate Tutorials to develop J2EE enterprise applications.

Hibernate Mapping Annotations

@AccessType

The @AccessType annotation is deprecated. You should use either the JPA @Access or the Hibernate native @AttributeAccessor annotation.

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This Week in Spring: Spring Cloud, Releases, Tutorials, and More

Hi, Spring fans! Welcome to another installment of This Week in Spring! This week, I’m in Marrakesh, Morocco, for the epic Devoxx MA talking about all things Spring and cloud with my friends — Google’s Ray Tsang and Microsoft’s Bruno Borges. Then tomorrow, it’s off to Bern and Zurich Switzerland for the local JUGs there. Also, I’m doing a live training on Safari — "Bootiful Kotlin," too.

As usual, we’ve got a ton of things to cover, so let’s get to it!

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This Week in Spring: Spring Cloud, Releases, Tutorials, and More

Hi, Spring fans! Welcome to another installment of This Week in Spring! This week, I’m in Marrakesh, Morocco, for the epic Devoxx MA talking about all things Spring and cloud with my friends — Google’s Ray Tsang and Microsoft’s Bruno Borges. Then tomorrow, it’s off to Bern and Zurich Switzerland for the local JUGs there. Also, I’m doing a live training on Safari — "Bootiful Kotlin," too.

As usual, we’ve got a ton of things to cover, so let’s get to it!

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Spring Tutorials and Guides [Links]

This page provides a list of guides and tutorials for quick references to those getting started with the Spring framework and Spring Boot.

Guides

Whatever you’re building, these guides are designed to get productive as quickly as possible, using the latest Spring project releases and techniques as recommended by the Spring team.

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This Week in Spring: News, Releases, Tutorials, and More

Hi, Spring fans! How’re things? I’m in Taipei, Taiwan, where I’ve presented at the local JUG and at the Cloud Native Forum. It’s been a crazy good time on the ground eating delicious "stinky tofu" (that’s its name!), trying to figure out the difference between traditional Chinese characters and so-called simplified Chinese characters used in China, and of course, making tons of new friends.

In less than 24 hours, I’ll be on a plane winging my way back west where I’ll join my family, friends, and our newest addition, and we’ll celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday together. It’s this time of year when I try to take stock of all the things for which I’m grateful and you know what, dear reader? Time and time again, I think of you, the community that makes Spring the best place to integrate and innovate. I am thankful for you. I’m sure I speak for the Spring team and Pivotal at large when I say, we are thankful for you.

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This Week in Spring: Spring Boot, Releases, and Cloud

Hi, Spring fans! Welcome to another installment of This Week in Spring! This week, I’m in Paris, France, for the amazing Voxxed Microservices event. This has been quite the show, and I’m grateful for having had the opportunity to attend. Now, as I write this, I’m preparing to go to Beijing, China, for the first leg in Asia of the SpringOne Tour show. I’ll be in China, then Japan, Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Los Angeles, Morocco, Seattle, Toronto, and then finally, in mid-December, I’ll return home to San Francisco. We’ve got a ton of things to look at this week, so without further ado, let’s get to it!

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This Week in Spring: Oracle CodeOne Edition

Hi, Spring fans! Welcome to another installment of This Week in Spring! This week, I’ve just flown back from Canada and Russia where I was at the amazing Joker conference in St. Petersburg. I’m now in San Francisco (where I live!) for a couple of days to soak up the amazing atmosphere around Oracle CodeOne and be reunited with the Java community and longtime friends. I’m so excited about the presentation that fellow Java Champion Trisha Gee and I are doing tomorrow at 11:30 am that introduces an end-to-end reactive and Spring-based application from JavaFX client to service. Do not miss this!

After CodeOne, I’ll fly back to Europe for business in Connecticut, and then, it’s off to Paris, FR, for the Voxxed Days Microservices event.

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Azure for Java Developers

When I did the last blog post about building a cloud backup app in Java with Azure, I kept it very high level, to just introduce the project and get a discussion rolling. Then an interesting thing happened that I’ve never, ever seen before: people on the internet had opinions that were wrong.

The comments I got were all over the web, but the fun was mainly on the Reddit post. There were some almost incoherent responses, so the one I’ll point out was the comment that writing a Java app on Azure was ” Like doing c# on linode. No thanks.” It’s an interesting, and really quite weird, response. The basic failing here is simply the assumption that C# is the only first-class citizen for Azure, which is just plain wrong. Certainly C# is a first-class citizen, but there is also support for Python, Java, JavaScript, etc. In many cases each Azure service offers a SDK for a large number of programming languages, which enables developers to write really quite simple code to connect to and use Azure services.

Just in the last few weeks I’ve recently opened two GitHub repos. The first one was a short-code URL generator using the Azure Functions service for serverless programming, and the second was a cloud sync backup app using Azure Storage. The key point is that in writing this code in Java I never dropped down to writing HTTP code to connect to the REST endpoint. From my opinion, if that is ever the solution to a web service problem, then the job isn’t yet complete!

If you are building a Java application that needs any kind of cloud functionality—storage, compute, or serverless, you should consider Microsoft Azure. If you are doing cool stuff with IoT, artificial intelligence, or machine learning, you should consider Microsoft Azure. At Microsoft we now have huge number of people who are working solely on ensuring that the Java developer experience is first-class—through APIs, through services, through documentation, and through developer advocacy. On a daily basis we are discussing how to fill gaps, improve experiences, and make what Java developers see and consume is the best it can be. If you want to play with Azure, there are even free offerings with substantial amounts of credit and free resources available (my personal favourite is the free 1,000,000 Azure Function calls a month—forever!).

So, I’ve been link heavy, but to wrap up, here are some important links to become familiar with as you dive into Java on Azure:

With that clarified, time to get back to working on The Cloud

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