ALU

Google

In hounding Google, the EU has shot itself in the foot

You have to hand it to Europe’s regulators. They rarely miss a chance to antagonise an American tech company, no matter what the cost to their own people. Original Link

Google will start charging phone makers for Europe app store

Google will start charging smartphone makers that want to install its app store and services for devices sold in Europe, changes it says it must make to comply with a European Union antitrust order. Original Link

Taxify now embedded in Google Maps in SA

Ride-hailing service Taxify – a direct competitor to market leader Uber – said on Thursday that it is now directly integrated with Google’s Maps app in South Africa. Original Link

Loon offers network controller for new constellations

Loon balloons carry LTE base stations to extend internet service to remote areas. This Loon is flying over New Zealand. Credit: Loon

MOUNTAIN VIEW, California — Loon, a subsidiary of Google’s parent company Alphabet, is promoting networking technology and user interfaces it developed to operate its high-altitude balloons for constellations of nongeostationary orbiting satellites.

“Our network on Loon and these low Earth orbit and medium Earth orbit constellations have a lot of similar challenges in network operations,” Brian Barritt, Loon technical lead, said Oct. 10 at Satellite Innovation 2018 here.

It’s common for people seeking access to the network to be moving around. In these networks, though, the middle of the network is also moving.

“The path the data may take, especially if your constellation has inter-satellite links or if it has multiple spot beams, can change very rapidly,” Barritt said.

Those changes can cause service disruption. To prevent that, Loon developed a temporospatial software defined network controller for both wired and wireless networks. It looks forward over time to predict connectivity and quality by evaluating the positions of all the ground stations, user terminals, satellites and taking into account global weather, Barritt said.

In addition, customers can load the controller with their network service goals like latency requirements.

“It’s up to the controller to figure out what inter-satellite links and ground segment routers to traverse, what gateway links to use how that should be transitioned over time,” Barritt said. “It avoids any disruption to network flows by pre-scheduling routing table changes, tasking changes to steerable beams and radio resource management, changes to channel and channel bandwidth all together in unison. So there is no delay, no disruption.”

SpaceNews.com

Original Link

Android creator working on AI phone that texts for you

Essential Products, the consumer electronics start-up run by Android creator Andy Rubin, is putting most projects aside to focus on development of a new kind of phone. Original Link

Briefing: Google’s China search engine is coming within nine months?

A leaked transcript of Google executives meeting shows a different picture from Google’s official statements. Original Link

Google unveils Pixel 3, other gadgets to chase rivals

Google showed off a pair of new Pixel phones, a tablet computer and a speaker with a screen in a deluge of new products aimed at competing with the latest gadgets from big technology rivals. Original Link

No, Internet companies, we did not consent to this

More than a decade into the era of prevalent social networks and smartphones, people still have no way to make informed choices about how to safely conduct their lives online. Original Link

Google admits to security flaw it failed to disclose

Google found a “software glitch” in its Google+ social network in March that could have exposed the personal data of as many as half a million users, but decided not to tell the public until Monday. Original Link

Why telecoms operators are terrified of Big Tech

Telecommunications carriers have long grumbled that they spend a fortune building the world’s data networks only to watch the US technology giants reap most of the benefits. Now they fear Silicon Valley will take away their customers, too. Original Link

IS adds Amazon, Google to cloud offering

Dimension Data’s Internet Solutions has bolstered its business cloud computing offering by adding partnerships with Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud to its CloudConnect offering. Original Link

Interview: Vivaldi CEO Jon von Tetzchner

In this episode of the podcast, Duncan McLeod interviews Jon von Tetzchner, CEO of Vivaldi Technologies, the company behind the Vivaldi Web browser. Original Link

Briefing: Eric Schmidt says China could split the internet

Schmidt highlighted the possibility of Chinese digital hegemony, which could be achieved through its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). Original Link

Alphabet ploughs money into Microsoft GitHub rival

GitLab, a platform for sharing and collaborating on code, has raised US$100-million to expand its suite of tools as it fights for market share with with Microsoft’s GitHub. Original Link

What Is Serverless Computing?

MicrosoftAmazon, and Google are now dedicated to branding pages for the topic “serverless,” which says something to all of us. It’s not a fad, and it’s here to stay.

Often times, all these new buzzwords will confuse us. The bottom line definition of serverless computing is “serverless computing allows you to build and run applications and services without thinking about servers."

Original Link

Silicon Valley is getting serious about your health

Apple’s new smartwatch is the latest proof: Big Tech is trying to remake health care in its own image. Original Link

Anger as EU votes in favour of new online copyright rules

Tech platforms and Internet activists protested the outcome of a European parliament vote on Wednesday to back copyright rules that would help video, music and other rights holders seek compensation for use of their content online. Original Link

Amazon joins the trillion-dollar club

Amazon.com shares rose as much as 1.9%, pushing the company briefly beyond a market value of US$1-trillion, a milestone Apple reached just last month. Original Link

Bootiful GCP: Globally Consistent Data Access With Spanner (Part 3)

Hi, Spring fans! In this brief part of the series, we’re going to look at Spring Cloud integration for the Google Cloud Platform, Spring Cloud GCP. Spring Cloud GCP represents a joint effort between Google and Pivotal that provides a first-class experience for Spring Cloud developers when using the Google Cloud Platform. Pivotal Cloud Foundry users will enjoy an even easier integration with the GCP service broker. I wrote these installments with input from the Google Cloud Developer Advocate and my buddy, Ray Tsang. You can also catch a walkthrough of Spring Cloud GCP in our Google Next 2018 session, Bootiful Google Cloud Platform. Thanks, buddy! As always, I’d love to hear from you if you have feedback.

If you’re just joining us, be sure to read the previous installments:

Original Link

Trump steps up attacks on Big Tech

US President Donald Trump, stepping up his criticism of technology firms he says are favouring liberal points of view, said they may be in a “very antitrust situation” but repeatedly said he can’t comment publicly on whether they should be broken up. Original Link

Now Amazon closes in on $1-trillion market cap

Amazon.com headed for its biggest gain in four months, pulling within US$26-billion of becoming America’s second trillion-dollar company, after Morgan Stanley said sales growth remains strong. Original Link

Trump’s bogus claims stir up tech risk

It’s tempting to ignore the early morning tweets of a technology-challenged US president. Donald Trump is wrong on the facts, but his complaints underscore the business threats to tech companies from growing and largely disingenuous complaints. Original Link

Trump accuses Google of rigging search results against him

US President Donald Trump has accused Google of rigging its search results to give preference to negative stories about him, adding his voice to conservatives who accuse social media companies of favouring liberal viewpoints. Original Link

Why developers are so mad at Apple and Google

If you need proof that giant technology companies behave a lot like borderless governments, look no further than the brewing “app store taxes” debate. Original Link

Apple, Google face revolt over app store ‘tax’

A backlash against the app stores of Apple and Google is gaining steam, with a growing number of companies saying the tech giants are collecting too high a tax for connecting consumers to developers’ wares. Original Link

Google’s internal dissent over China plans sheds light on broader transparency issues in China

Like Schrodinger’s cat, most people and businesses in China, in relation to the law, can be considered something like “Schrodinger’s criminal.” Original Link

Google not compromising its principles over China: Sergey Brin

Google CEO Sundar Pichai told employees at a meeting that plans to re-enter China with a search engine are “exploratory” and in “early stages”, addressing a topic that has exploded with controversy. Original Link

Google employees not happy about new plans for China

Google workers already proved their power after objecting to a project with the US military. Original Link

“100% China developed” browser engine turns out to be a Chromium fork

Founder and CEO of Redcore says the browser is based on Google’s Chromium but insisted they have adapted it to meet the demands of Chinese clients. Original Link

Eight years later, Google Search won’t beat Baidu

There is little chance that Google’s return will change the established scene in China’s search engine sector. Original Link

Google ads could soon be targeting a billboard near you

Google may be about to pair all that data it has on users’ Web browsing with the ads displayed on public billboards. Creepy? Maybe. Inevitable? Almost certainly. Original Link

Google in China: 5 winners, 4 losers, and 3 questions

What does Google reentering China mean for everyone else in a notoriously fierce competitive environment. Original Link

More details revealed on Google’s search engine for China

The report also found that Google has been working with sampled search queries from 265.com, a Chinese-language web directory service based in Beijing and owned by Google. Original Link

Baidu’s Robin Li isn’t worried about Google’s rumored return

Baidu CEO Robin Li has said he welcomes the competition and that Baidu would “win again.” Original Link

Google is in China cloud talks with Tencent

Google wants to get back into China, and is laying the groundwork for a key part of the initiative: bringing its cloud business to the world’s second largest economy. Original Link

Google Cloud Next Recap

Several interesting announcements from last week’s Google Next conference.

Knative, a new OSS project built by Google, Red Hat, IBM, and others to build, deploy, and manage modern serverless workloads on Kubernetes. Built upon Istio, with 1.0 coming soon and managed Istio on GCP. It includes a build primitive to manage source-to-Kubernetes flows, that can be used independently. Maybe it is the new standard to define sources and builds in Kubernetes. Read more from Mark Chmarny.

Original Link

Google to submit to Chinese censorship, report says

Google is preparing to launch a censored version of its search engine for China that will block results Beijing considers sensitive, The Intercept reported. Original Link

Google is planning a censored version of its search engine for China

Google has been planning to launch a censored version of its search engine in China under a project code-named Dragonfly, according to documents obtained by The Intercept. The project started last year in April after Sundar Pinchai’s meeting with the Chinese government. Google engineers have built two different versions of the search engine Android app […] Original Link

What if companies that profit from your data had to pay you?

When it comes to digital privacy, there are plenty of organisations making money out of using your data. But what if you were the one making the money? Original Link

This Week in Spring: Spring Security, KNative, Spring Cloud, and More!

Hi Spring fans! Welcome to another installment of This Week in Spring! This week I’m in San Francisco in studio with Spring Security lead Rob Winch, filming our new Spring Security Livelessons video. There is so much to cover that, as you can imagine, it’s a tall order even for the two of us!

I’m also busily preparing for my talk with my buddy and Googler Ray Tsang at this week’s Google Cloud NEXT event on all things Pivotal and Google Cloud. We’re going to look at the bootiful Spring Cloud GCP project and, importantly, the new project jointly announced between Google and Pivotal just this morning — KNative. KNative will serve as the platform that we at Pivotal have built and deployed on our Project Riff serverless function-as-a-service runtime. Do not miss it if you’re around!

Alright, we’ve got a lot to cover related to Pivotal, Google, KNative, Spring, and so much more, so let’s get to it!

Developers! Quickly and easily gain access to the tools and information you need! Explore, test and combine our data quality APIs at Melissa Developer Portal – home to tools that save time and boost revenue. Our APIs verify, standardize, and correct the Big 4 + more – name, email, phone and global addresses – to ensure accurate delivery, prevent blacklisting and identify risks in real-time.

Topics:

java ,spring ,spring boot ,reactive spring ,pivotal ,spring cloud ,spring rest docs ,spring security ,knative ,google

Original Link

Episode 174: How Wyze makes such a crazy, good camera for cheap

This week I was at Google’s cloud event in San Francisco while Kevin swapped out his video doorbells. We discuss Google’s news related to edge computing and several pieces of doorbell news before talking about a few recent articles that show how far the smart home has to come. Kevin talks about the first NB-IoT tracker for the U.S., a new Bluetooth security flaw, and how Google’s cloud differs from AWS in his experience connecting our voicemail hotline to the cloud. We also cover a surprise contender for the worst connected device seen this week and answer a question on Alexa and hubs that is probably pretty common.

This is the $20 Wyze camera.

This week’s guest is Elana Fishman, COO of Wyze Labs, who came on to explain how the company can make a high-quality HD camera for between $20 and $30. The combo of a low price and a good camera obviously works. Wyze has sold more than 500,000 cameras so far! She also answers questions about security, privacy and the company’s recent integration with Amazon’s Alexa ecosystem. You’ll enjoy the show.

Hosts: Stacey Higginbotham and Kevin Tofel
Guest: Elana Fishman, COO of Wyze Labs
Sponsors: Afero and Smart Kitchen Summit

  • How Google’s IoT cloud stuff compares with Amazon’s and Microsoft’s
  • Neurotic people might not want smart home gear
  • The dumbest IoT product of the week
  • How does Wyze make a camera that costs 10X less than Nest’s?
  • Wyze has sold half a million IoT devices. That’s insane!

Original Link

Episode 174: How Wyze makes such a crazy, good camera for cheap

This week I was at Google’s cloud event in San Francisco while Kevin swapped out his video doorbells. We discuss Google’s news related to edge computing and several pieces of doorbell news before talking about a few recent articles that show how far the smart home has to come. Kevin talks about the first NB-IoT tracker for the U.S., a new Bluetooth security flaw, and how Google’s cloud differs from AWS in his experience connecting our voicemail hotline to the cloud. We also cover a surprise contender for the worst connected device seen this week and answer a question on Alexa and hubs that is probably pretty common.

This is the $20 Wyze camera.

This week’s guest is Elana Fishman, COO of Wyze Labs, who came on to explain how the company can make a high-quality HD camera for between $20 and $30. The combo of a low price and a good camera obviously works. Wyze has sold more than 500,000 cameras so far! She also answers questions about security, privacy and the company’s recent integration with Amazon’s Alexa ecosystem. You’ll enjoy the show.

Hosts: Stacey Higginbotham and Kevin Tofel
Guest: Elana Fishman, COO of Wyze Labs
Sponsors: Afero and Smart Kitchen Summit

  • How Google’s IoT cloud stuff compares with Amazon’s and Microsoft’s
  • Neurotic people might not want smart home gear
  • The dumbest IoT product of the week
  • How does Wyze make a camera that costs 10X less than Nest’s?
  • Wyze has sold half a million IoT devices. That’s insane!

Original Link

Episode 174: How Wyze makes such a crazy, good camera for cheap

This week I was at Google’s cloud event in San Francisco while Kevin swapped out his video doorbells. We discuss Google’s news related to edge computing and several pieces of doorbell news before talking about a few recent articles that show how far the smart home has to come. Kevin talks about the first NB-IoT tracker for the U.S., a new Bluetooth security flaw, and how Google’s cloud differs from AWS in his experience connecting our voicemail hotline to the cloud. We also cover a surprise contender for the worst connected device seen this week and answer a question on Alexa and hubs that is probably pretty common.

This is the $20 Wyze camera.

This week’s guest is Elana Fishman, COO of Wyze Labs, who came on to explain how the company can make a high-quality HD camera for between $20 and $30. The combo of a low price and a good camera obviously works. Wyze has sold more than 500,000 cameras so far! She also answers questions about security, privacy and the company’s recent integration with Amazon’s Alexa ecosystem. You’ll enjoy the show.

Hosts: Stacey Higginbotham and Kevin Tofel
Guest: Elana Fishman, COO of Wyze Labs
Sponsors: Afero and Smart Kitchen Summit

  • How Google’s IoT cloud stuff compares with Amazon’s and Microsoft’s
  • Neurotic people might not want smart home gear
  • The dumbest IoT product of the week
  • How does Wyze make a camera that costs 10X less than Nest’s?
  • Wyze has sold half a million IoT devices. That’s insane!

Original Link

Flutter: What All the Fuss Is About

Flutter is Google’s open-source mobile application development SDK for crafting high-quality native applications for Android and iOS in record time. With Flutter, Google open ups a new way to build fast, attractive mobile apps that helps developers to break away from “cookie cutter” apps.

With the announcement of Flutter Release Preview 1, everyone wants to know what makes Flutter different, or the need to push all other native tools aside and focus on only one toolchain — the Flutter Platform and SDK from Google. What is new and exciting about Flutter? Why Flutter? It’s a fair question, and this article is about to answer it from a technical viewpoint — not just what is exciting, but why.

Flutter

Flutter is a cross-platform framework designed to address both the Android and iOS platforms. It’s based on Google’s own Dart programming language with a rendering engine based on the Skia Graphics Library, the same thing Chrome uses to draw pixels on a screen. There’s an IntelliJ IDE for Flutter, just like Google has with Android Studio. Google is also using Flutter in its upcoming Fuchsia OS.

Flutter Epiphany

Flutter removed all the platform-specific UI bureaucracy and provides reactive-style views like React Native. It takes a different approach to avoid performance issues caused by the need for a JavaScript bridge by using a compiled programming language, namely Dart. Another factor that makes Flutter shine is the tooling. When you apply changes to the code, you can see your results in sub-second cycles.

Core Principles

Flutter includes a modern React-style framework, a 2D rendering engine, ready-made widgets, and development tools. These components work together to help you design, build, test, and debug apps. Everything in Flutter is organized around a few core principles.

Let’s go deeper, one aspect at a time.

The Dart Programming Language

Dart is a big reason why developers love Flutter.

Dart is Google’s own programming language that was released as a direct competitor to JavaScript. Dart’s internal adoption at Google has been extensive with AdWords, AdSense, and Google Fiber teams in order to write their customer-facing web apps.

Why Flutter Uses Dart

Because it matched the way they were building user interfaces.

Dart has a lot of object-oriented features that are essential for serious development than the JavaScript holds. In other words, for being a “real” programming language, JavaScript isn’t up and Dart is going to fill that glaring gap.

Dart is compiled “ahead of time” (AOT) into native code for multiple platforms. This allows Flutter to interact with the platform without going through a JavaScript bridge that does a context switch. Dart can also be Just in Time (JIT) compiled for exceptionally fast development cycles and game-changing workflow. Compiling to native code also improves app launch time.

Hot Reload!

Flutter offers fast development. Its website promises “Hot Reload in milliseconds to paint your app to life.”

In cross-platform frameworks, JavaScript needs to go through a bridge in order to talk to the native code. With Dart, Flutter eliminates the need to use a context switch, or the “bridge,” and as a result, it breaks the orthodox structure of code implementation.

For instance, React Native works across two domains: first, the native domain, and second, the JavaScript domain. It uses JavaScript to access the OEM widgets in the native realm. Each domain by itself is blazingly fast. But the performance bottleneck often occurs when we move from one realm to the other. In order to architect performant, React Native apps, we must keep passes over the bridge to a minimum. Otherwise, this can cause performance problems.

Wm Leler, Senior Software Engineer at Google, further explains: “Widgets are typically accessed quite frequently (up to 60 times a second during animations, transitions, or when the user “swipes” something on the screen with their finger) so this can cause performance problems.”

Flutter has a concept called “plugins” that specifically intended to let you use existing platform libraries. Dart code talks to the OEM side that is implemented using the native library. In this way, Flutter completely bypasses the iOS and Android OEM control pipeline and draws the entire screen as a Skia canvas, with its own dart UI widgets.

Flutter is the only mobile SDK that provides reactive views without requiring a JavaScript bridge should be enough to make Flutter interesting and worth trying.

Flutter fixes this issue by injecting the updated source code files into the running Dart Virtual Machine (VM). The VM updates classes with the latest versions of fields and functions. Next, the Flutter framework automatically rebuilds the widget tree. This allows to instantly view the changes that you’ve made. In Flutter, you can deploy and test an app on a device instantly. Instant change detection would multiply productivity, reduce cost, and cut down development time.

So, the hot-reload function of Flutter adds great value!

Flutter UI

Instead of wiring up to native Android and iOS components, Flutter paints every single pixel to the screen. Flutter has pixel-perfect replications of the iOS UI and Android’s Material UI, so you can create familiar experiences in an out of the box way.

Flutter’s real power is in creating totally custom interfaces and animations. In Flutter the layouts are defined using Dart code only. There is no XML/templating language or any visual designer/storyboarding tool either.

Like other frameworks, Flutter uses reactive views and refreshes the view tree for every new frame, it creates many smooth animations and transitions that run at 60fps. Dart uses “generational garbage collection” that is very efficient for this kind of system, because objects, especially short-lived ones, are relatively cheap. In addition, allocation of objects can be done with a single pointer bump, which is fast and doesn’t require locks. This helps to avoid UI jank and stutter.

Everything Is a Widget

Widgets are critical to an app’s view and interface. They need to look good and natural irrespective of the screen size. They must perform fast, should be extensible and also customizable. Flutter makes it all possible by providing its own widgets.

Dart also has a tree shaking compiler, which only includes code that you need in your app. You can feel free to use a large library of widgets even if you only need one or two of them.

Flutter has a widget for everything and which again is a productivity booster.

The “Everything is a Widget” approach of Flutter made it easy to compose custom UIs from a rich set of building blocks provided by the framework. And, because Flutter runs on both iOS and Android, it’s easier to spend our time creating beautiful designs instead of porting the UI.

Try It!

There are lot more in Flutter framework, to build apps and make them interactive.

The latest Release Preview 1 SDK is available on Flutter’s site, and users wondering what all the fuss is about can check out something from the Flutter app showcase.

Original Link

Flutter: What All the Fuss Is About

Flutter is Google’s open-source mobile application development SDK for crafting high-quality native applications for Android and iOS in record time. With Flutter, Google open ups a new way to build fast, attractive mobile apps that helps developers to break away from “cookie cutter” apps.

With the announcement of Flutter Release Preview 1, everyone wants to know what makes Flutter different, or the need to push all other native tools aside and focus on only one toolchain — the Flutter Platform and SDK from Google. What is new and exciting about Flutter? Why Flutter? It’s a fair question, and this article is about to answer it from a technical viewpoint — not just what is exciting, but why.

Flutter

Flutter is a cross-platform framework designed to address both the Android and iOS platforms. It’s based on Google’s own Dart programming language with a rendering engine based on the Skia Graphics Library, the same thing Chrome uses to draw pixels on a screen. There’s an IntelliJ IDE for Flutter, just like Google has with Android Studio. Google is also using Flutter in its upcoming Fuchsia OS.

Flutter Epiphany

Flutter removed all the platform-specific UI bureaucracy and provides reactive-style views like React Native. It takes a different approach to avoid performance issues caused by the need for a JavaScript bridge by using a compiled programming language, namely Dart. Another factor that makes Flutter shine is the tooling. When you apply changes to the code, you can see your results in sub-second cycles.

Core Principles

Flutter includes a modern React-style framework, a 2D rendering engine, ready-made widgets, and development tools. These components work together to help you design, build, test, and debug apps. Everything in Flutter is organized around a few core principles.

Let’s go deeper, one aspect at a time.

The Dart Programming Language

Dart is a big reason why developers love Flutter.

Dart is Google’s own programming language that was released as a direct competitor to JavaScript. Dart’s internal adoption at Google has been extensive with AdWords, AdSense, and Google Fiber teams in order to write their customer-facing web apps.

Why Flutter Uses Dart

Because it matched the way they were building user interfaces.

Dart has a lot of object-oriented features that are essential for serious development than the JavaScript holds. In other words, for being a “real” programming language, JavaScript isn’t up and Dart is going to fill that glaring gap.

Dart is compiled “ahead of time” (AOT) into native code for multiple platforms. This allows Flutter to interact with the platform without going through a JavaScript bridge that does a context switch. Dart can also be Just in Time (JIT) compiled for exceptionally fast development cycles and game-changing workflow. Compiling to native code also improves app launch time.

Hot Reload!

Flutter offers fast development. Its website promises “Hot Reload in milliseconds to paint your app to life.”

In cross-platform frameworks, JavaScript needs to go through a bridge in order to talk to the native code. With Dart, Flutter eliminates the need to use a context switch, or the “bridge,” and as a result, it breaks the orthodox structure of code implementation.

For instance, React Native works across two domains: first, the native domain, and second, the JavaScript domain. It uses JavaScript to access the OEM widgets in the native realm. Each domain by itself is blazingly fast. But the performance bottleneck often occurs when we move from one realm to the other. In order to architect performant, React Native apps, we must keep passes over the bridge to a minimum. Otherwise, this can cause performance problems.

Wm Leler, Senior Software Engineer at Google, further explains: “Widgets are typically accessed quite frequently (up to 60 times a second during animations, transitions, or when the user “swipes” something on the screen with their finger) so this can cause performance problems.”

Flutter has a concept called “plugins” that specifically intended to let you use existing platform libraries. Dart code talks to the OEM side that is implemented using the native library. In this way, Flutter completely bypasses the iOS and Android OEM control pipeline and draws the entire screen as a Skia canvas, with its own dart UI widgets.

Flutter is the only mobile SDK that provides reactive views without requiring a JavaScript bridge should be enough to make Flutter interesting and worth trying.

Flutter fixes this issue by injecting the updated source code files into the running Dart Virtual Machine (VM). The VM updates classes with the latest versions of fields and functions. Next, the Flutter framework automatically rebuilds the widget tree. This allows to instantly view the changes that you’ve made. In Flutter, you can deploy and test an app on a device instantly. Instant change detection would multiply productivity, reduce cost, and cut down development time.

So, the hot-reload function of Flutter adds great value!

Flutter UI

Instead of wiring up to native Android and iOS components, Flutter paints every single pixel to the screen. Flutter has pixel-perfect replications of the iOS UI and Android’s Material UI, so you can create familiar experiences in an out of the box way.

Flutter’s real power is in creating totally custom interfaces and animations. In Flutter the layouts are defined using Dart code only. There is no XML/templating language or any visual designer/storyboarding tool either.

Like other frameworks, Flutter uses reactive views and refreshes the view tree for every new frame, it creates many smooth animations and transitions that run at 60fps. Dart uses “generational garbage collection” that is very efficient for this kind of system, because objects, especially short-lived ones, are relatively cheap. In addition, allocation of objects can be done with a single pointer bump, which is fast and doesn’t require locks. This helps to avoid UI jank and stutter.

Everything Is a Widget

Widgets are critical to an app’s view and interface. They need to look good and natural irrespective of the screen size. They must perform fast, should be extensible and also customizable. Flutter makes it all possible by providing its own widgets.

Dart also has a tree shaking compiler, which only includes code that you need in your app. You can feel free to use a large library of widgets even if you only need one or two of them.

Flutter has a widget for everything and which again is a productivity booster.

The “Everything is a Widget” approach of Flutter made it easy to compose custom UIs from a rich set of building blocks provided by the framework. And, because Flutter runs on both iOS and Android, it’s easier to spend our time creating beautiful designs instead of porting the UI.

Try It!

There are lot more in Flutter framework, to build apps and make them interactive.

The latest Release Preview 1 SDK is available on Flutter’s site, and users wondering what all the fuss is about can check out something from the Flutter app showcase.

Original Link

  • 1
  • 2
  • 5